Works Cited

1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The History of Malaria: An Ancient Disease. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/malaria/about/history. Last accessed August 27, 2016.

2. World Health Organization. World Malaria Report: 2015. Geneva: WHO Press; 2015. Available at http://www.who.int/malaria/publications/world-malaria-report-2015/report/en. Last accessed August 27, 2016.

3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Malaria. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/malaria. Last accessed August 27, 2016.

4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Treatment of Malaria: Guidelines for Clinicians (United States). Available at http://www.cdc.gov/malaria/diagnosis_treatment/treatment.html. Last accessed August 27, 2016.

5. Griffith KS, Lewis LS, Mali S, Parise ME. Treatment of malaria in the United States: a systematic review. JAMA. 2007;297(20):2264-2277.

6. Kantele A, Jokiranta S. Plasmodium knowlesi: the fifth species causing human malaria. Duodecim. 2010;126(4):427-434.

7. Wilairatanal P, Krudsood S, Tangpukdee N. Management of Plasmodium knowlesi malaria without PCR confirmation. Southeast Asian J Trop Med Public Health. 2010;41(1):19-21.

8. Lee KS, Cox-Singh J, Singh B. Morphological features and differential counts of Plasmodium knowlesi parasites in naturally acquired human infections. Malar J. 2009;8:73.

9. Cox-Singh J, Davis TM, Lee KS, et al. Plasmodium knowlesi malaria in humans is widely distributed and potentially life threatening. Clin Infect Dis. 2008;46(2):165-171.

10. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Malaria. Available at http://www.niaid.nih.gov/topics/malaria/Pages/default.aspx. Last accessed August 27, 2016.

11. Spadafora C, Awandare GA, Kopydlowski KM, et al. Complement receptor 1 is a sialic acid-independent erythrocyte receptor of Plasmodium falciparum. PloS Pathog. 2010;6(6):e1000968.

12. Figtree M, Lee R, Bain L, et al. Plasmodium knowlesi in human, Indonesian Borneo. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(4):672-674.

13. Zhang M, Fennell C, Ranford-Cartwright L, et al. The Plasmodium eukaryotic initiation factor-2{alpha} kinase IK2 controls the latency of sporozoites in the mosquito salivary glands. J Exp Med. 2010;207(7):1465-1474.

14. Sullivan D. Uncertainty in mapping malaria epidemiology: implications for control. Epidemiol Rev. 2010;32(1):175-187.

15. Cullen KA, Mace KE, Arguin PM. Malaria Surveillance—United States, 2013. MMWR Surveill Summ. 2016;65(2):1-22.

16. Kappe SH, Vaughan AM, Boddey JA, Cowman AF. That was then but this is now: malaria research in the time of an eradication agenda. Science. 2010;328(5980):862-866.

17. Filler SJ, MacArthur JR, Parise M, et al. Locally acquired mosquito-transmitted malaria: a guide for investigations in the United States. MMWR Recomm Rep. 2006;55(RR13):1-9.

18. World Health Organization. Malaria. Available at http://www.who.int/topics/malaria/en. Last accessed August 27, 2016.

19. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Malaria Diagnosis and Treatment in the United States. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/malaria/diagnosis_treatment/index.html. Last accessed August 27, 2016.

20. Thwing J, Skarbinski J, Newman RD, et al. Appendix: microscopic procedures for diagnosing malaria. MMWR. 2007;56(SS6): 39-40.

21. Maltha J, Gillet P, Bottieau E, Cnops L, van Esbroeck M, Jacobs J. Evaluation of a rapid diagnostic test (CareStartTM Malaria HRP-2/pLDH (Pf/pan) Combo Test) for the diagnosis of malaria in a reference setting. Malar J. 2010;9:171.

22. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Malaria Diagnosis: Rapid Diagnostic Test. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/malaria/diagnosis_treatment/rdt.html. Last accessed August 27, 2016.

23. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Notifiable Disease Surveillance System Malaria (Plasmodium spp.) 2014 case definition. Available at http://wwwn.cdc.gov/nndss/conditions/malaria/case-definition/2014/. Last accessed August 27, 2016.

24. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. How to Report a Case of Malaria. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/malaria/report.html. Last accessed August 27, 2016.

25. Lucumi E, Darling C, Jo H, et al. Discovery of potent small molecule inhibitors of multi-drug resistant P. falciparum using a novel miniaturized high-throughput luciferase-based assay. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2010;54(9):3597-3604.

26. Singh B. Plasmodium knowlesi: an update. Microbiology Australia. 2016;1:39-42.

27. World Health Organization. Malaria: Rapid Diagnostic Tests. Available at http://www.who.int/malaria/areas/diagnosis/rapid_diagnostic_tests/en/. Last accessed August 27, 2016.

28. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Artesunate is Available to Treat Severe Malaria in United States. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/malaria/diagnosis_treatment/artesunate.html. Last accessed August 27, 2016.

29. World Health Organization. International Travel and Health: Malaria. Available at http://www.who.int/ith/diseases/malaria/en/. Last accessed August 27, 2016.

30. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Travelers' Health: Yellow Book Homepage. Available at http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/yellowbook-home-2014/. Last accessed August 27, 2016.

31. World Health Organization. Malaria: Information for Travelers. Available at http://www.who.int/malaria/travellers/en/. Last accessed August 27, 2016

32. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Malaria and Travelers. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/malaria/travelers/index.html. Last accessed August 27, 2016.

33. Bell DJ, Lalloo DG. Malaria and travelers. In: Zuckerman JN (ed). Principles and Practice of Travel Medicine. 2nd ed. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell; 2013: 126-132.

34. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Malaria Risk Assessment for Travelers. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/malaria/travelers/risk_assessment.html. Last accessed August 27, 2016.

35. Brunette GW, Kozarsky PE, Magill AJ, Shlim DR. CDC Health Information for International Travel 2016. New York, NY: Oxford University Press; 2015.

36. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Counterfeit and Substandard Antimalarial Drugs. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/malaria/travelers/counterfeit_drugs.html. Last accessed August 27, 2016.

37. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. How Can Malaria Cases and Deaths be Reduced? Available at http://www.cdc.gov/malaria/malaria_worldwide/reduction/index.html. Last accessed August 27, 2016.

38. UNICEF. Health: Malaria. Available at http://www.unicef.org/health/index_malaria.html. Last accessed August 27, 2016.

39. Russell TL, Lwetoijera DW, Maliti D, et al. Impact of promoting longer-lasting insecticide treatment of bed nets upon malaria transmission in a rural Tanzanian setting with pre-existing high coverage of untreated nets. Malar J. 2010;9(1):187.

40. World Health Organization. WHO Recommended Long-Lasting Insecticidal Nets. Available at http://www.who.int/whopes/Long-lasting_insecticidal_nets_April_2016.pdf?ua=1. Last accessed August 27, 2016.

41. Smereck J. Malaria in pregnancy: update on emergency management. J Emerg Med. 2011;40(4):393-396.

42. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Intermittent Preventive Treatment of Malaria for Pregnant Women (IPTp). Available at http://www.cdc.gov/malaria/malaria_worldwide/reduction/iptp.html. Last accessed August 27, 2016.

43. Kayentao K, Garner P, van Eijk AM, et al. Intermittent preventive therapy for malaria during pregnancy using 2 vs 3 or more doses of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine and risk of low birth weight in Africa: systematic review and meta-analysis. JAMA. 2013;309(6):594-604.

44. Global Malaria Programme. Indoor Residual Spraying: Use of Indoor Residual Spraying for Scaling Up Global Malaria Control and Elimination. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2006. Available at http://whqlibdoc.who.int/hq/2006/WHO_HTM_MAL_2006.1112_eng.pdf. Last accessed August 27, 2016.

45. Alonso PL, Sacarial J, Aponte JJ, et al. Efficacy of the RTS,S/AS02A vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum infection and disease in young African children: randomised controlled trial. Lancet. 2004;364(9443):1411-1420.

46. Fauci AS, Touchette NA, Folkers GK. Emerging infectious diseases: a 10-year perspective from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Emerging Infect Dis. 2005;11(4):519-525.

47. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Choosing a Drug to Prevent Malaria. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/malaria/travelers/drugs.html. August 27, 2016.

48. Olotu A, Fegan G, Wambua J, et al. Seven-year efficacy of RTS,S/AS01 malarial vaccine among young african children. New Eng J Med. 2016;374:2519-2529.

49. Malaria Vaccine Initiative. Next generation vaccine. Available at http://www.malariavaccine.org/malaria-and-vaccines/next-generation-vaccine.

50. Clemens J, Moorthy V. Implementation of RTS,S/AS01 malaria vaccine: the need for further evidence. New Eng J Med. 2016;374:2596-2597.

51. Malaria Vaccine Initiative. Our Research and Development Strategy. Available at http://www.malariavaccine.org/malaria-and-vaccines/vaccine-development/our-research-and-development-strategy. Last accessed August 27, 2016.

52. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Malaria: Biology. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/malaria/about/biology/index.html. Last accessed August 27, 2016.

53. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Where Malaria Occurs. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/malaria/about/distribution.html. Last accessed August 27, 2016.

54. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC and Malaria. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/malaria/about/activities.html. Last accessed August 27, 2016.

55. World Health Organization. International Travel and Health: Malaria: 2015 update. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2015.

56. Malaria Vaccine Initiative. First-Generation Vaccine: RTS,S. Available at http://www.malariavaccine.org/malaria-and-vaccines/first-generation-vaccine. Last accessed August 27, 2016.

57. RTS,S Clinical Trials Partnership. Efficacy and safety of RTS,S/AS01 malaria vaccine with or without a booster dose in infants and children in Africa: final results of a phase 3, individually randomised, controlled trial. Lancet. 2015;386(9988):31-45.

Evidence-Based Practice Recommendations Citations

1. Angus BJ, Schmid ML, Dockrell DH, Grant AD. Travel-related opportunistic infections. In: British HIV Association and British Infection Association guidelines for the treatment of opportunistic infection in HIV-seropositive individuals, 2011. HIV Med. 2011;12(Suppl 2):88-101. Summary retrieved from National Guideline Clearinghouse at https://www.guideline.gov/summaries/summary/48020. Last accessed September 13, 2016.


Copyright © 2016 NetCE, P.O. Box 997571, Sacramento, CA 95899-7571
Mention of commercial products does not indicate endorsement.