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Evidence-Based Practice Recommendations Citations

1. World Health Organization. WHO Guidelines for the Treatment of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2016. Available at http://www.who.int/reproductivehealth/publications/rtis/gonorrhoea-treatment-guidelines/en. Last accessed September 19, 2018.

2. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Syphilis Infection in Nonpregnant Adults and Adolescents: Screening. Available at https://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/Page/Document/UpdateSummaryFinal/syphilis-infection-in-nonpregnant-adults-and-adolescents. Last accessed September 19, 2018.

3. Panel on Opportunistic Infections in HIV-Infected Adults and Adolescents. Guidelines for Prevention and Treatment of Opportunistic Infections in HIV-Infected Adults and Adolescents. Washington, DC: Department of Health and Human Services; 2018. Summary retrieved from National Guideline Clearinghouse at https://aidsinfo.nih.gov/contentfiles/lvguidelines/adult_oi.pdf. Last accessed September 19, 2018.


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