Study Points

Human Trafficking: How to Recognize the Problem and Respond

Course #P6161 - $10 • 2 Hours/Credits

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  • Participation Instructions
    • Review the course material online or in print.
    • Complete the course evaluation.
    • Review your Transcript to view and print your Certificate of Completion. Your date of completion will be the date (Pacific Time) the course was electronically submitted for credit, with no exceptions. Partial credit is not available.
  1. Forcing a person to work for little or no pay is called "labor trafficking."

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  2. Cities or towns where human trafficking happens may eventually become less violent.

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  3. Because immigrant workers are not unusual in nail salons (at least in parts of the United States where there are many immigrants), people are less likely to notice women being taken in or out of salons or to wonder who they are.

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  4. Even without outright slavery or force, using extreme pressure to push a person into prostitution can still be human trafficking.

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  5. If the people entering a nail salon during business hours are mostly male, this is a sign that prostitution may be occurring.

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  • Back to Course Home
  • Participation Instructions
    • Review the course material online or in print.
    • Complete the course evaluation.
    • Review your Transcript to view and print your Certificate of Completion. Your date of completion will be the date (Pacific Time) the course was electronically submitted for credit, with no exceptions. Partial credit is not available.