Works Cited

Malaria and the International Traveler

Course #94363 - $15 • 3 Hours/Credits

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  • Participation Instructions
    • Review the course material online or in print.
    • Complete the course evaluation.
    • Review your Transcript to view and print your Certificate of Completion. Your date of completion will be the date (Pacific Time) the course was electronically submitted for credit, with no exceptions. Partial credit is not available.

1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The History of Malaria: An Ancient Disease. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/malaria/about/history. Last accessed August 28, 2019.

2. World Health Organization. World Malaria Report: 2015. Geneva: WHO Press; 2015. Available at https://www.who.int/malaria/publications/world-malaria-report-2015/report/en. Last accessed August 28, 2019.

3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Malaria. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/parasites/malaria/index.html. Last accessed August 28, 2019.

4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Malaria Treatment (United States). Available at https://www.cdc.gov/malaria/diagnosis_treatment/treatment.html. Last accessed August 28, 2019.

5. Griffith KS, Lewis LS, Mali S, Parise ME. Treatment of malaria in the United States: a systematic review. JAMA. 2007;297(20):2264-2277.

6. Kantele A, Jokiranta S. Plasmodium knowlesi: the fifth species causing human malaria. Duodecim. 2010;126(4):427-434.

7. Wilairatanal P, Krudsood S, Tangpukdee N. Management of Plasmodium knowlesi malaria without PCR confirmation. Southeast Asian J Trop Med Public Health. 2010;41(1):19-21.

8. Lee KS, Cox-Singh J, Singh B. Morphological features and differential counts of Plasmodium knowlesi parasites in naturally acquired human infections. Malar J. 2009;8:73.

9. Cox-Singh J, Davis TM, Lee KS, et al. Plasmodium knowlesi malaria in humans is widely distributed and potentially life threatening. Clin Infect Dis. 2008;46(2):165-171.

10. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Malaria. Available at https://www.niaid.nih.gov/diseases-conditions/malaria. Last accessed August 29, 2019.

11. Spadafora C, Awandare GA, Kopydlowski KM, et al. Complement receptor 1 is a sialic acid-independent erythrocyte receptor of Plasmodium falciparum. PloS Pathog. 2010;6(6):e1000968.

12. Figtree M, Lee R, Bain L, et al. Plasmodium knowlesi in human, Indonesian Borneo. Emerg Infect Dis. 2010;16(4):672-674.

13. Zhang M, Fennell C, Ranford-Cartwright L, et al. The Plasmodium eukaryotic initiation factor-2{alpha} kinase IK2 controls the latency of sporozoites in the mosquito salivary glands. J Exp Med. 2010;207(7):1465-1474.

14. Sullivan D. Uncertainty in mapping malaria epidemiology: implications for control. Epidemiol Rev. 2010;32(1):175-187.

15. Cullen KA, Mace KE, Arguin PM. Malaria surveillance—United States, 2013. MMWR Surveill Summ. 2016;65(2):1-22.

16. Kappe SH, Vaughan AM, Boddey JA, Cowman AF. That was then but this is now: malaria research in the time of an eradication agenda. Science. 2010;328(5980):862-866.

17. Filler SJ, MacArthur JR, Parise M, et al. Locally acquired mosquito-transmitted malaria: a guide for investigations in the United States. MMWR Recomm Rep. 2006;55(RR13):1-9.

18. World Health Organization. Malaria. Available at http://www.who.int/topics/malaria/en. Last accessed August 29, 2019.

19. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Malaria Diagnosis and Treatment in the United States. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/malaria/diagnosis_treatment/index.html. Last accessed August 29, 2019.

20. Thwing J, Skarbinski J, Newman RD, et al. Appendix: microscopic procedures for diagnosing malaria. MMWR. 2007;56(SS6):39-40.

21. Maltha J, Gillet P, Bottieau E, Cnops L, van Esbroeck M, Jacobs J. Evaluation of a rapid diagnostic test (CareStartTM Malaria HRP-2/pLDH (Pf/pan) Combo Test) for the diagnosis of malaria in a reference setting. Malar J. 2010;9:171.

22. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Malaria Diagnosis: Rapid Diagnostic Test. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/malaria/diagnosis_treatment/diagnostic_tools.html#tabs-2-2. Last accessed August 29, 2019.

23. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Notifiable Disease Surveillance System Malaria (Plasmodium spp.) 2014 case definition. Available at https://wwwn.cdc.gov/nndss/conditions/malaria/case-definition/2014. Last accessed August 29, 2019.

24. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. How to Report a Case of Malaria. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/malaria/report.html. Last accessed August 29, 2019.

25. Lucumi E, Darling C, Jo H, et al. Discovery of potent small molecule inhibitors of multi-drug resistant P. falciparum using a novel miniaturized high-throughput luciferase-based assay. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2010;54(9):3597-3604.

26. Singh B. Plasmodium knowlesi: an update. Microbiology Australia. 2016;1:39-42.

27. World Health Organization. Malaria: Rapid Diagnostic Tests. Available at https://www.who.int/malaria/areas/diagnosis/rapid_diagnostic_tests/en. Last accessed August 29, 2019.

28. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Artesunate is Available to Treat Severe Malaria in United States. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/malaria/diagnosis_treatment/artesunate.html. Last accessed August 29, 2019.

29. World Health Organization. International Travel and Health: Malaria. Available at https://www.who.int/ith/diseases/malaria/en. Last accessed August 29, 2019.

30. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Travelers' Health: Yellow Book Homepage. Available at https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/yellowbook/2020. Last accessed August 29, 2019.

31. World Health Organization. Malaria: Information for Travelers. Available at https://www.who.int/malaria/travellers/en. Last accessed August 29, 2019

32. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Malaria and Travelers. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/malaria/travelers/index.html. Last accessed August 29, 2019.

33. Bell DJ, Lalloo DG. Malaria and travelers. In: Zuckerman JN (ed). Principles and Practice of Travel Medicine. 2nd ed. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell; 2013: 126-132.

34. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Malaria Risk Assessment for Travelers. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/malaria/travelers/risk_assessment.html. Last accessed August 29, 2019.

35. Brunette GW, Kozarsky PE, Magill AJ, Shlim DR. CDC Health Information for International Travel 2016. New York, NY: Oxford University Press; 2015.

36. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Counterfeit and Substandard Antimalarial Drugs. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/malaria/travelers/counterfeit_drugs.html. Last accessed August 29, 2019.

37. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. How Can Malaria Cases and Deaths be Reduced? Available at https://www.cdc.gov/malaria/malaria_worldwide/reduction/index.html. Last accessed August 29, 2019.

38. UNICEF. Childhood Diseases. Available at https://www.unicef.org/health/childhood-diseases. Last accessed August 29, 2019.

39. Russell TL, Lwetoijera DW, Maliti D, et al. Impact of promoting longer-lasting insecticide treatment of bed nets upon malaria transmission in a rural Tanzanian setting with pre-existing high coverage of untreated nets. Malar J. 2010;9(1):187.

40. World Health Organization. Achieving Universal Coverage with Long-Lasting Insecticidal Nets in Malaria Control. Available at https://www.afro.who.int/sites/default/files/2017-06/who_recommendations_universal_coverage_llins.pdf. Last accessed August 29, 2019.

41. Smereck J. Malaria in pregnancy: update on emergency management. J Emerg Med. 2011;40(4):393-396.

42. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Intermittent Preventive Treatment of Malaria for Pregnant Women (IPTp). Available at https://www.cdc.gov/malaria/malaria_worldwide/reduction/iptp.html. Last accessed August 29, 2019.

43. Kayentao K, Garner P, van Eijk AM, et al. Intermittent preventive therapy for malaria during pregnancy using 2 vs 3 or more doses of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine and risk of low birth weight in Africa: systematic review and meta-analysis. JAMA. 2013;309(6):594-604.

44. Global Malaria Programme. Indoor Residual Spraying: Use of Indoor Residual Spraying for Scaling Up Global Malaria Control and Elimination. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2006. Available at https://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/69386/WHO_HTM_MAL_2006.1112_eng.pdf. Last accessed August 29, 2019.

45. Alonso PL, Sacarial J, Aponte JJ, et al. Efficacy of the RTS,S/AS02A vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum infection and disease in young African children: randomised controlled trial. Lancet. 2004;364(9443):1411-1420.

46. Fauci AS, Touchette NA, Folkers GK. Emerging infectious diseases: a 10-year perspective from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Emerging Infect Dis. 2005;11(4):519-525.

47. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Choosing a Drug to Prevent Malaria. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/malaria/travelers/drugs.html. August 29, 2019.

48. Olotu A, Fegan G, Wambua J, et al. Seven-year efficacy of RTS,S/AS01 malarial vaccine among young african children. New Eng J Med. 2016;374:2519-2529.

49. Malaria Vaccine Initiative. Next Generation Vaccine. Available at https://www.malariavaccine.org/malaria-and-vaccines/next-generation-vaccine. Last accessed August 29, 2019.

50. Clemens J, Moorthy V. Implementation of RTS,S/AS01 malaria vaccine: the need for further evidence. New Eng J Med. 2016;374:2596-2597.

51. Malaria Vaccine Initiative. Our Research and Development Strategy. Available at https://www.malariavaccine.org/malaria-and-vaccines/vaccine-development/our-research-and-development-strategy. Last accessed August 29, 2019.

52. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Malaria: Biology. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/malaria/about/biology/index.html. Last accessed August 29, 2019.

53. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Where Malaria Occurs. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/malaria/about/distribution.html. Last accessed August 29, 2019.

54. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC and Malaria. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/malaria/about/activities.html. Last accessed August 29, 2019.

55. World Health Organization. International Travel and Health: Malaria: 2015 update. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2015.

56. Malaria Vaccine Initiative. First-Generation Vaccine: RTS,S. Available at https://www.malariavaccine.org/malaria-and-vaccines/rtss. Last accessed August 29, 2019.

57. RTS,S Clinical Trials Partnership. Efficacy and safety of RTS,S/AS01 malaria vaccine with or without a booster dose in infants and children in Africa: final results of a phase 3, individually randomised, controlled trial. Lancet. 2015;386(9988):31-45.

58. World Health Organization. World Malaria Report 2018. Available at https://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/275867/9789241565653-eng.pdf?ua=1. Last accessed August 29, 2019.

59. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Congenital malaria—Nassau County, New York, 2004. MMWR. 2005;54(15); 383-384.

60. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. FDA Approves Only Drug in U.S. to Treat Severe Malaria. Available at https://www.fda.gov/news-events/press-announcements/fda-approves-only-drug-us-treat-severe-malaria. Last accessed June 19, 2020.

  • Back to Course Home
  • Participation Instructions
    • Review the course material online or in print.
    • Complete the course evaluation.
    • Review your Transcript to view and print your Certificate of Completion. Your date of completion will be the date (Pacific Time) the course was electronically submitted for credit, with no exceptions. Partial credit is not available.