Works Cited

Integrating Religion and Spirituality into Counseling

Course #71610 - $25 • 5 Hours/Credits

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  • Participation Instructions
    • Review the course material online or in print.
    • Complete the course evaluation.
    • Review your Transcript to view and print your Certificate of Completion. Your date of completion will be the date (Pacific Time) the course was electronically submitted for credit, with no exceptions. Partial credit is not available.

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23. Robertson L. The Spiritual Competency Scale: A Comparison to the ASERVIC Spiritual Competencies. Available at http://etd.fcla.edu/CF/CFE0002422/Robertson_Linda_A_200812_PhD.pdf. Last accessed May 1, 2020.

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27. Cashwell CS, Young JS. Integrating Spirituality and Religion Into Counseling: A Guide to Competent Practice. 3rd ed. Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Association; 2020.

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52. Miller G. The development of the spiritual focus in counseling and counselor education. J Couns Dev. 2011;77(4):498-501.

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61. Dilthey W. Dilthey's philosophy of existence: introduction to Weltanschauungslehre. In: Cashwell CS, Young DS (eds). Integrating Spirituality and Religion Into Counseling: A Guide to Competent Practice. 3rd ed. Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Association; 2020.

62. Miller G. Incorporating Spirituality in Counseling and Psychotherapy. New York, NY: John Wiley & Sons; 2003.

63. Fishbane M. Judaism: revelation and traditions. In: Cashwell CS, Young DS (eds). Integrating Spirituality and Religion Into Counseling: A Guide to Competent Practice. 3rd ed. Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Association; 2020: 44.

64. Morrison M, Brown S. Judaism: a guide to competent practice. In: Cashwell CS, Young DS (eds). Integrating Spirituality and Religion Into Counseling: A Guide to Competent Practice. 3rd ed. Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Association; 2020: 44.

65. Gold JM. Counseling and Spirituality: Integrating Spiritual and Clinical Orientations. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson; 2010.

66. Frankiel S. Christianity: a way to salvation. In: Wiggins-Frame M (ed). Integrating Religion and Spirituality Into Counseling: A Comprehensive Approach. Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole-Thomson Learning; 2003: 65.

67. Rahman F. Islam, Encarta Encyclopedia. In: Wiggins-Frame M (ed). Integrating Religion and Spirituality Into Counseling: A Comprehensive Approach. Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole-Thomson Learning; 2003: 68.

68. Hedayat-Diba Z. Psychotherapy with Muslims. In: Wiggins-Frame M (ed). Integrating Religion and Spirituality Into Counseling: A Comprehensive Approach. Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole-Thomson Learning; 2003: 69.

69. O'Flaherty WD. Hinduism. In: Wiggins-Frame M (ed). Integrating Religion and Spirituality Into Counseling: A Comprehensive Approach. Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole-Thomson Learning; 2003: 70.

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72. Sharma AR. Psychotherapy with Hindus. In: Wiggins-Frame M (ed). Integrating Religion and Spirituality Into Counseling: A Comprehensive Approach. Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole-Thomson Learning; 2003: 70.

73. McDermott JP. Buddhism. In: Wiggins-Frame M (ed). Integrating Religion and Spirituality Into Counseling: A Comprehensive Approach. Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole-Thomson Learning; 2003: 72.

74. Wangu MB. Buddhism. In: Wiggins-Frame M (ed). Integrating Religion and Spirituality Into Counseling: A Comprehensive Approach. Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole-Thomson Learning; 2003: 73.

75. Lester RC. Buddhism: the path to Nirvana. In: Cashwell CS, Young DS (eds). Integrating Spirituality and Religion Into Counseling: A Guide to Competent Practice. 3rd ed. Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Association; 2020: 49-50.

76. Smith H. The religious man. In: Wiggins-Frame M (ed). Integrating Religion and Spirituality Into Counseling: A Comprehensive Approach. Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole-Thomson Learning; 2003.

77. Liu WC. Confucianism.: Wiggins-Frame M (ed). Integrating Religion and Spirituality Into Counseling: A Comprehensive Approach. Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole-Thomson Learning; 2003: 75.

78. Hartz PR. Taoism. In: Wiggins-Frame M (ed). Integrating Religion and Spirituality Into Counseling: A Comprehensive Approach. Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole-Thomson Learning; 2003: 76.

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80. Watts AW. Shinto. In: Cashwell CS, Young DS (eds). Integrating Spirituality and Religion Into Counseling: A Guide to Competent Practice. 3rd ed. Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Association; 2020: 51.

81. Earhart HB. Religion of Japan: many traditions, one sacred way. In: Wiggins-Frame M (ed). Integrating Religion and Spirituality Into Counseling: A Comprehensive Approach. Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole-Thomson Learning; 2003.

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89. Allport GW. The individual and his religion. In: Wiggins-Frame M (ed). Integrating Religion and Spirituality Into Counseling: A Comprehensive Approach. Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole-Thomson Learning; 2003: 37-38.

90. Worthington EL. Religious faith across lifespan: implications for counseling and research. Wiggins-Frame M (ed). Integrating Religion and Spirituality Into Counseling: A Comprehensive Approach. Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole-Thomson Learning;37.

91. Fowler JW. Stages of faith: the psychology of human development and the quest for meaning. In: Cashwell CS, Young DS (eds). Integrating Spirituality and Religion Into Counseling: A Guide to Competent Practice. 3rd ed. Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Association; 2020: 98-99.

92. Oser FK. The development of religious judgment. In: Wiggins-Frame M (ed). Integrating Religion and Spirituality Into Counseling: A Comprehensive Approach. Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole-Thomson Learning; 2003: 45-46.

93. Genia V. Counseling and psychotherapy of religious clients: a developmental approach. In: Wiggins-Frame M (ed). Integrating Religion and Spirituality Into Counseling: A Comprehensive Approach. Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole-Thomson Learning; 2003: 47-49.

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95. Gills CS, Harper MC, Dailey SF. Assessing the spiritual and religions domain. In: Cashwell CS, Young DS (eds). Integrating Spirituality and Religion Into Counseling: A Guide to Competent Practice. 3rd ed. Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Association; 2020: 44.

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  • Back to Course Home
  • Participation Instructions
    • Review the course material online or in print.
    • Complete the course evaluation.
    • Review your Transcript to view and print your Certificate of Completion. Your date of completion will be the date (Pacific Time) the course was electronically submitted for credit, with no exceptions. Partial credit is not available.