Works Cited

Oral Manifestations of Sexually Transmitted Infections

Course #54072 - $35 • 5 Hours/Credits

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  • Participation Instructions
    • Review the course material online or in print.
    • Complete the course evaluation.
    • Review your Transcript to view and print your Certificate of Completion. Your date of completion will be the date (Pacific Time) the course was electronically submitted for credit, with no exceptions. Partial credit is not available.

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5. California Department of Public Health. California STD Screening Recommendations, 2015. Available at https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/CID/DCDC/CDPH%20Document%20Library/CA_STD-Screening-Recs.pdf. Last accessed September 12, 2021.

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16. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Two New Promising Treatment Regimens for Gonorrhea: Additional Options Urgently Needed. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/nchhstp/newsroom/2013/Gonorrhea-Treatment-Trial-PressRelease.html. Last accessed September 12, 2021.

17. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Syphilis: CDC Fact Sheet. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/std/syphilis/stdfact-syphilis.htm. Last accessed September 12, 2021.

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27. Gargano J, Meites E, Watson M, Unger E, Markowitz L, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Manual for Surveillance of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases. Chapter 5: Human Papillomavirus (HPV). Available at https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/surv-manual/chpt05-hpv.html. Last accessed September 12, 2021.

28. Syrjänen S. Human papillomavirus infections and oral tumors. Med Microbiol Immunol. 2003;192(3):123-128.

29. Lukes SM, Meneses MB. The dental hygienist's role in HPV recognition. Dimens Dent Hyg. 2010;8(6):72.75-77.

30. University of Washington. Oral Pathology Case of the Month: Condyloma Acuminatum. Available at https://dental.washington.edu/oral-pathology/case-of-the-month-archives/com-jan-2011-diagnosis. Last accessed September 12, 2018.

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32. Weiss A, Dym H. Oral Lesions Caused by the Human Papillomavirus. Available at http://www.clinicaladvisor.com/cmece-features/oral-lesions-caused-by-human-papillomavirus/article/193918. Last accessed September 12, 2021.

33. Fazel N, Wilczynski S, Lowe L, Su LD. Clinical, histopathologic and molecular aspects of cutaneous human papillomavirus infections. Dermatol Clin. 1999;17(3):521-536.

34. Bosch FX, Burchell AN, Schiffman M, et al. Epidemiology and natural history of the human papillomavirus infections and type-specific implications in cervical neoplasia. Vaccine. 2008;26(1):K1-K16.

35. Patton L, Glick M. The ADA Practical Guide to Patients with Medical Conditions. 2nd ed. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell; 2016.

36. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. HPV and Oropharyngeal Cancer. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/hpv/basic_info/hpv_oropharyngeal.htm. Last accessed September 12, 2021.

37. National Cancer Institute. Oropharyngeal Cancer Treatment (Adult). Available at https://www.cancer.gov/types/head-and-neck/hp/adult/oropharyngeal-treatment-pdq. Last accessed September 12, 2021.

38. Waldboomers JM, Jacobs MV, Manos MM, et al. Human papillomavirus is a necessary cause of invasive cervical cancer worldwide.J Pathol. 1999;189(1):12-19.

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41. European Society for Medical Oncology. FDA Approves Gardasil 9 for Prevention of Certain Cancers Caused by Five Additional Types of HPV. Available at https://www.esmo.org/oncology-news/archive/fda-approves-gardasil-9-for-prevention-of-certain-cancers-caused-by-five-additional-types-of-hpv. Last accessed September 12, 2021.

42. Herrero R, Quint W, Hildesheim A, et al. Reduced prevalence of oral human papillomavirus (HPV) 4 years after bivalent HPV vaccination in a randomized clinical trial in Costa Rica. PLoS One. 2013;8(7):e68329.

43. Ozden B, Gunduz K, Gunhan O, Ozden FO. A case report of focal epithelial hyperplasia (Heck's disease) with PCR detection of human papillomavirus. J Maxillofac Oral Surg. 2011;10(4):357-360.

44. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Epstein-Barr Virus and Infectious Mononucleosis. Available athttps://www.cdc.gov/epstein-barr/index.html. Last accessed September 12, 2021.

45. Ebell MH. Epstein-Barr virus infectious mononucleosis. Am Fam Physician. 2004;70(7):1279-1287.

46. Shetty K. Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Infectious Mononucleosis (Mono) Workup. Available at https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/222040-workup. Last accessed September 12, 2021.

47. Ónodi-Nagy K, Kinyó Á, Meszes A, Garaczi E, Kemény L, Bata-Csörgő Z. Amoxicillin rash in patients with infectious mononucleosis: evidence of true drug sensitization. Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol. 2015;11(1):1.

48. Cade JE. Hairy Leukoplakia. Available at https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/279269-overview. Last accessed September 12, 2021.

49. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Genital Herpes. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/std/Herpes/STDFact-Herpes.htm. Last accessed September 12, 2021.

50. Xu F, Sternberg MR, Kottiri BJ, et al. Trends in herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 seroprevalence in the United States. JAMA, 2006; 296(8):964-973.

51. Johns Hopkins Medicine. Genital Herpes. Available at https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/herpes-hsv1-and-hsv2/genital-herpes. Last accessed September 12, 2021.

52. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2016 Sexually Transmitted Diseases Surveillance: Chlamydia. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/std/statistics/2019/overview.htm#Chlamydia. Last accessed September 12, 2021.

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55. Joyce MP, Kuhar D, Brooks JT. Notes from the field: occupationally acquired HIV infection among health care workers—United States, 1985–2013. MMWR. 2015;63(53):1245-1246.

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57. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Revised surveillance case definition for HIV infection—United States, 2014. MMWR. 2014;63(RR3):1-10.

58. Vaseliu N, Kamiru H, Kabue M. Oral Manifestations of HIV Infection. Available at https://bipai.org/sites/bipai/files/13-Oral-Manifestations.pdf. Last accessed September 12, 2021.

59. Tyring SK (ed). Mucosal Immunology and Virology. Singapore: Springer-Verlag London Limited; 2006.

60. Dodd CL, Greenspan D, Greenspan JS. Oral Kaposi's sarcoma in a woman as a first indication of HIV infection. J Am Dent Assoc. 1991;122(4):61-63.

61. Reznik DA. Oral manifestations of HIV disease. Top HIV Med. 2005;13(5):143-148.

62. Schlecht NF, Masika M, Diaz A, et al. Risk of oral human papillomavirus infection among sexually active female adolescents receiving the quadrivalent vaccine. JAMA Netw Open. 2019;2(10):e1914031.

  • Back to Course Home
  • Participation Instructions
    • Review the course material online or in print.
    • Complete the course evaluation.
    • Review your Transcript to view and print your Certificate of Completion. Your date of completion will be the date (Pacific Time) the course was electronically submitted for credit, with no exceptions. Partial credit is not available.