Works Cited

Infection Control for Dental Professionals

Course #54051 - $35 • 5 Hours/Credits

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  • Participation Instructions
    • Review the course material online or in print.
    • Complete the course evaluation.
    • Review your Transcript to view and print your Certificate of Completion. Your date of completion will be the date (Pacific Time) the course was electronically submitted for credit, with no exceptions. Partial credit is not available.

1. U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Dental Work: Careers in Oral Care. Available at https://www.bls.gov/careeroutlook/2020/article/dental-careers.htm. Last accessed January 18, 2022.

2. California Code of Regulations. Section 1005: Minimum Standards for Infection Control. Available at https://govt.westlaw.com/calregs/Document/I3F75D9A0B95D11E0A3CAA6663E6464AA. Last accessed January 18, 2022.

3. Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Bloodborne Pathogens Standards, 1910.1030. Available at https://www.osha.gov/laws-regs/regulations/standardnumber/1910/1910.1030. Last accessed January 18, 2022.

4. California Department of Industrial Regulation. Code of Regulations: Aerosol Transmissible Diseases. Available at https://www.dir.ca.gov/Title8/5199.html. Last accessed January 18, 2022.

5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Seasonal Influenza Vaccination Resources for Health Professionals. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/professionals/vaccination/index.htm. Last accessed January 18, 2022.

6. Harrel SK, Molinari J. Aerosols and splatter in dentistry: a brief review of the literature and infection control implications. J Am Dent Assoc. 2004;135(4):429-437.

7. Siegel JD, Rhinehart E, Jackson M, Chiarello L, the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee. 2007 Guideline for Isolation Precautions: Preventing Transmission of Infectious Agents in Healthcare Settings. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/infectioncontrol/pdf/guidelines/isolation-guidelines-H.pdf. Last accessed January 18, 2022.

8. Treakle AM, Thom KA, Furuno JP, Strauss SM, Harris AD, Perencevich EN. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and white coats of healthcare workers. Am J Infect Control. 2009;37(2):101-105.

9. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Exposure to Blood: What Healthcare Personnel Need to Know. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/HAI/pdfs/bbp/Exp_to_Blood.pdf. Last accessed January 18, 2022.

10. Kohn WG, Collins AS, Cleveland JL, Harte JA, Eklund KJ, Malvitz DM. Guidelines for infection control in dental health-care settings—2003. MMWR. 2003;52(RR17):1-61.

11. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Infection Control in Dental Settings: FAQs Bloodborne Pathogens and Aerosols. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/oralhealth/infectioncontrol/faqs/bloodborne-exposures.html. Last accessed January 18, 2022.

12. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Surveillance of Occupationally Acquired HIV/AIDS in Healthcare Personnel, as of December 2010. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/HAI/organisms/hiv/Surveillance-Occupationally-Acquired-HIV-AIDS.html. Last accessed January 18, 2022.

13. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Epidemiologic notes and reports update: transmission of HIV infection during invasive dental procedures—Florida. MMWR. 1991;40(23):377-381.

14. Cardo DM, Culver DH, Ciesielski CA, et al. A case-control study of HIV seroconversion in health care workers after percutaneous exposure. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Needlestick Surveillance Group. N Engl J Med. 1997;337(21):1485-1490.

15. California Department of Public Health. Cal/OSHA's Aerosol Transmissible Disease Standards and Local Health Departments. Available at https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Programs/CCDPHP/DEODC/OHB/CDPH%20Document%20Library/ATD-Guidance.pdf. Last accessed January 18, 2022.

16. Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Frequently Asked Questions: Needlestick. Available at http://www.osha.gov/needlesticks/needlefaq.html. Last accessed January 18, 2022.

17. Pittet D. Improving adherence to hand hygiene practice: a multidisciplinary approach. Emerg Infect Dis. 2001;7(2):1818-1865.

18. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Oral Health. FAQs: Personal Protective Equipment. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/oralhealth/infectioncontrol/faqs/personal-protective-equipment.html. Last accessed January 18, 2022.

19. Klevens RM, Edwards JR, Richards CL Jr, et al. Estimating health care-associated infections and deaths in U.S. hospitals, 2002. Public Health Rep. 2007;122(2):160-166.

20. Sehulster L, Chinn RYW. Guidelines for environmental infection control in health-care facilities, 2003. MMWR. 2003;52(RR10):1-42.

21. Rutala WA, Weber DJ, the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee. Guideline for Disinfection and Sterilization in Healthcare Facilities, 2008. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/infectioncontrol/pdf/guidelines/disinfection-guidelines-H.pdf. Last accessed October 21, 2021.

22. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Reprocessing of Single-Use Devices. Available at https://www.fda.gov/medical-devices/products-and-medical-procedures/reprocessing-reusable-medical-devices. Last accessed January 18, 2022.

23. Bolyard EA, Tablan OC, Williams WW, et al. Guidelines for infection control in healthcare personnel, 1998. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1998;19(6):407-463.

24. Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Personal Protective Equipment. Available at https://www.osha.gov/personal-protective-equipment. Last accessed January 18, 2022.

25. Jensen PA, Lambert LA, Iademarco MF, Ridzon R. Guidelines for preventing the transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in health-care settings, 2005. MMWR. 2005;54(RR17):1-144.

26. American Dental Association. Tuberculosis. Available at https://www.ada.org/en/member-center/oral-health-topics/tuberculosis-overview-and-dental-treatment-conside. Last accessed January 18, 2022.

27. Boles C, Parker J, Hallett L, Henshaw J. Current understanding and future directions for an occupational infectious disease standard. Toxicology and Industrial Health. 2020;36(9):703-710.

28. Estrela C, Ribeiro RG, Estrela CR, Pécora JD, Sousa-Neto MD. Antimicrobial effect of 2% sodium hypochlorite and 2% chlorhexidine tested by different methods. Braz Dent J. 2003;14(1):58-62.

29. Hübner NO, Handrup S, Meyer G, Kramer A. Impact of the "Guidelines for infection prevention in dentistry" (2006) by the Commission of Hospital Hygiene and Infection Prevention at the Robert Koch-Institute (KRINKO) on hygiene management in dental practices—analysis of a survey from 2009. GMS Krankenhhyg Interdiszip. 2012;7(1):Doc14.

30. Simmons College. Press Release: Superbug Transmitted by Textiles: Research Cites Clothing as Key Link in Spread of Infection. Available at http://www.hospitalinfection.org/PDF/Dr.%20Liz%20Scott%20PR.pdf. Last accessed January 18, 2022.

31. American Medical Association. AMA Meeting: Hand-Washing Trumps Dress Codes in Preventing Infections. Available athttps://www.amednews.com/article/20100628/profession/306289923/7/. Last accessed January 18, 2022.

32. Kramer A, Schwebke I, Kampf G. How long do nosocomial pathogens persist on inanimate surfaces? A systematic review.BMC Infectious Diseases. 2006;6:130.

33. Mast EE, Weinbaum CM, Fiore AM, et al. A comprehensive immunization strategy to eliminate transmission of hepatitis B virus infection in the United States: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) part II: immunization of adults. MMWR. 2006;55(RR16):1-25.

34. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Hand Hygiene in the Healthcare Setting. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/handhygiene/science. Last accessed January 18, 2022.

35. Pfoh E, Dy S, Engineer C. Interventions to Improve Hand Hygiene Compliance: Brief Update Review. In: Making Health Care Safer II: An Updated Critical Analysis of the Evidence for Patient Safety Practices. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; 2013.

36. U.S. Public Health Service. Updated U.S. Public Health Service guidelines for the management of occupational exposures to HBV, HCV, and HIV and recommendations for postexposure prophylaxis. MMWR. 2001;50(RR11):1-52.

37. United States Department of Labor. Occupational Safety and Health Administration. 1910.132—General Requirements. Available at https://www.osha.gov/laws-regs/regulations/standardnumber/1910/1910.132. Last accessed January 18, 2022.

38. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Reprocessing Medical Devices in Health Care Settings: Validation Methods and Labeling Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff: 2011. Available at https://www.fda.gov/media/80265/download. Last accessed January 18, 2022.

39. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. HIV and Occupational Exposure. Available at https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/workplace/healthcareworkers.html. Last accessed January 18, 2022.

  • Back to Course Home
  • Participation Instructions
    • Review the course material online or in print.
    • Complete the course evaluation.
    • Review your Transcript to view and print your Certificate of Completion. Your date of completion will be the date (Pacific Time) the course was electronically submitted for credit, with no exceptions. Partial credit is not available.