Course Case Studies

Elder Abuse: Cultural Contexts and Implications

Course #97823 - $25 • 5 Hours/Credits

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  • Participation Instructions
    • Review the course material online or in print.
    • Complete the course evaluation.
    • Review your Transcript to view and print your Certificate of Completion. Your date of completion will be the date (Pacific Time) the course was electronically submitted for credit, with no exceptions. Partial credit is not available.
Learning Tools - Case Studies

CASE STUDY 1


For several weeks, church members noticed that Mr. L, 82 years of age, had bruises, cuts, and scrapes on his face, hands, and arms. Mr. L always had some plausible explanation and, knowing that he was the sole caretaker for his very ill wife of 61 years, they did not press the issue. A hospital social worker finally contacted APS after Mr. L drove himself to the hospital emergency room, over 20 miles from his home, with multiple fractures to his left arm. The APS social worker eventually discovered that Mr. L was being attacked by his wife, who was suffering from undiagnosed Alzheimer disease and had become combative. Mr. L did not know that his wife's behavior was a part of her illness and was protecting her.

Learning Tools - Case Studies

CASE STUDY 2


Mrs. J, a long time insulin-dependent diabetic, was admitted to the hospital after being brought to her physician's office by a neighbor who became concerned after not seeing Mrs. J for several days. Mrs. J finally told hospital staff members that she had run out of insulin several days ago and had given her grandson all the money she had to go and refill her prescription. He did not return, and Mrs. J did not call family members because she did not want to get him in trouble.

Learning Tools - Case Studies

CASE STUDY 3


Mr. B, 74 years of age, complains with increasing frequency of pain. His physician is puzzled by the complaints because the methadone she has prescribed should be controlling the pain. She has already increased the dosage a couple of times and is reluctant to do so again. She finally asked a family member to bring in all of Mr. B's medications so that she could check for drug/drug interactions or perhaps prescribe another medication. Examination of the methadone tablets revealed that someone had switched most of the methadone with over-the-counter potassium tablets, which are nearly the same size and color. Mr. B's failing eyesight prevented him from being able to tell the difference between the very similar tablets. Questioning revealed that Mr. B's niece, a former drug addict, had been living with him in exchange for his care, and that she prepared his medications each day. The family suspected that she was using drugs again, but was reluctant to probe too deeply because there was no one else to care for Mr. B.

Learning Tools - Case Studies

CASE STUDY 4


Mr. R, 54 years of age, and Mrs. R, 49 years of age, work full time in very demanding jobs. About one year ago, Mr. and Mrs. R built an apartment addition onto their home, depleting their savings, to accommodate Mrs. R's mother, Mrs. D. Mrs. R is the oldest of three siblings and care for her aging mother had become primarily her responsibility. The 90-minute drive to her mother's apartment in a nearby city each weekend had become increasingly taxing, and her mother's care had become more time consuming. When Mrs. D's long-time physician announced his intent to leave private practice, it became reasonable to make the move. Mrs. D, while not enthusiastic, was agreeable. Mrs. R's brother and sister, who rarely visited or helped with her mother's growing needs, became angry about the move and stated that they had no intention of making such a trip. Now, in addition to working 9 to 10 hours per day, Mrs. R goes home to find numerous messages from her mother with various requests and demands. Additionally, because her mother can see her car drive up, the phone is usually ringing by the time she gets into the house to begin dinner for the three of them. There is an in-home aide who comes three days per week to help with bathing and light cleaning, but lately Mrs. R has questioned whether this is worth the added burden of mediating disputes between the aide and her mother. Each morning before work, Mrs. R prepares her mother's medications for the day and makes sure she has something available for breakfast. She longs for a vacation, but the routine continues seven days per week. Besides, all her vacation and sick leave must be devoted to taking care of her mother's medical appointments and treatments. Lately, Mrs. R has been having difficulty sleeping with disturbing dreams of having forgotten some major task. She feels tired all of the time. She has also noticed that she snaps at her spouse and friends often and that her anxiety level is increasing. Her own household chores are piling up because she does not have the time or energy to do them. Last week she noticed a red rash on her thigh and wonders when she might find the time to see her own doctor.

Learning Tools - Case Studies

CASE STUDY 5


Mr. J had returned to live with his mother, Mrs. J, a widow of ten years, after his wife insisted he leave their house. During this time, he became depressed and started to drink. Mrs. J's neighbors became concerned that Mrs. J had lost a tremendous amount of weight and looked sad and disheveled lately. One day, Mrs. J confided to one of her neighbors that ever since her son returned to live with her, he had been pilfering her Social Security checks. Initially, she noticed that small amounts of money were missing from her pocketbook, but now, Mr. J threatens her both verbally and physically. He would smash and throw china at her until Mrs. J handed her signed Social Security check to him.

  • Back to Course Home
  • Participation Instructions
    • Review the course material online or in print.
    • Complete the course evaluation.
    • Review your Transcript to view and print your Certificate of Completion. Your date of completion will be the date (Pacific Time) the course was electronically submitted for credit, with no exceptions. Partial credit is not available.