Course Case Studies

Child Abuse Identification and Reporting: The Pennsylvania Requirement

Course #97542 - $24 • 3 Hours/Credits

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  • Participation Instructions
    • Review the course material online or in print.
    • Complete the course evaluation.
    • Review your Transcript to view and print your Certificate of Completion. Your date of completion will be the date (Pacific Time) the course was electronically submitted for credit, with no exceptions. Partial credit is not available.
Learning Tools - Case Studies

CASE STUDY 1


A young boy comes into the community health clinic for a physical exam. The boy's mother hovers and does not seem to want to let her son answer any questions. During the exam, in the process of taking blood, the nurse notices some bruises and lacerations on the boy's arm. Later, bruises in the shape of a belt are observed on the boy's back as well. Upon questioning, the boy will only say that he was "bad."

In this case, the nurse should make a report to ChildLine. This would be classified as a CPS case, and an investigation would be conducted. More information will be presented about reporting in later sections of this course.

Learning Tools - Case Studies

CASE STUDY 2


Ms. J, a neighbor, notices E (5 years of age) and S (6 years of age) running around their front yard at 8 p.m. The front door of the house is wide open, and Ms. J asks if their mother is home. S states that her mother went out with her girlfriend to a party. Ms. J asks if a babysitter is at the house, and S answers "no" again. This is not the first time neighbors have noticed that the kids are left at home alone. The neighbors report that the mother often comes home late, intoxicated.

In this case, a bystander (likely Ms. J or one of the neighbors) could call ChildLine, the local county agency, or even the police, and the case would be addressed by GPS. More information will be presented about reporting in later sections of this course.

Learning Tools - Case Studies

CASE STUDY 3


In the following case scenarios, consider if the case should be reported as possible child abuse in accordance with Pennsylvania law.

A young girl, 2 years of age, is brought to the emergency department by her mother and stepfather for a scalp laceration. The girl is very quiet and appears listless and out of sorts. Her mother reports that she was injured when she fell onto a rock outside, but that the injury occurred when the girl was being watched by the stepfather. The girl undergoes assessment for traumatic brain injury, including assessment of function using the modified Glasgow Coma Score. The toddler is found to have mild impairment (a score of 13), and the follow-up test two hours later indicates normal functioning. The nurse notices that the toddler appears to be afraid of the stepfather, leaning away and crying when he is near her. The stepfather also appears to be easily frustrated with the child, saying that he does not know why she cries so much.

A boy, 13 years of age, is undergoing a routine physical exam with his family physician. The physician asks the boy if he is excited to start school in the next few weeks and how his baseball team is doing. The boy becomes quiet and states that he is nervous about an upcoming trip with his baseball team but does not give additional information. When asked directly, the boy says that he is uncomfortable with the new assistant coach, who watches pornography with them during out-of-town tournaments and supplies them with pornographic magazines. However, the boy states that he doesn't think it's a big deal and that "all of the other kids seem to really like it."

  • Back to Course Home
  • Participation Instructions
    • Review the course material online or in print.
    • Complete the course evaluation.
    • Review your Transcript to view and print your Certificate of Completion. Your date of completion will be the date (Pacific Time) the course was electronically submitted for credit, with no exceptions. Partial credit is not available.